Tuesday, February 2, 2010

You there in the Glenn Beck T-shirt headed off to the Tea Party Patriot rally

Reprinted in full from slacktivist (found thanks to Justin Klocksiem):

"Hey you. You there in the Glenn Beck T-shirt headed off to the Tea Party Patriot rally.

Stop shouting for a moment, please, I want to explain to you why you're so very angry.

You should be angry. You're getting screwed.

I think you know that. But you don't seem to know that it doesn't have to be that way. You can stop it. You can stop it easily because the system that's screwing you over can only keep screwing you over if you keep demanding that it do so.

So stop demanding that. Stop helping the system screw you over.

Look, you can go back to yelling at me in a minute, but just read this first.

1. Get out your pay stub.

Or, if you have direct deposit -- you really should get direct deposit, it saves a lot of time and money (I point this out because, honestly, I'm trying to help you here, even though you don't make that easy Mr. Angry Screamy Guy) -- then take out that little paper receipt they give you when your pay gets directly deposited.

2. Notice that your net pay is lower than your gross pay. This is because some of your wages are withheld every pay period.

3. Notice that only some of this money that was withheld went to pay taxes. (I know, I know -- yeearrrgh! me hates taxes! -- but just try to stick with me for just a second here.)

4. Notice that some of the money that was withheld didn't go to taxes, but to your health insurance company.

5. Now go get a pay stub from last year around this time, from January of 2009.

6. Notice that the amount of your pay withheld for taxes in your current paycheck is less than the amount that was withheld a year ago.

That's because of President Barack Obama's economic stimulus plan, which included more than $200 billion in tax cuts, including the one you're holding right there in your hand, the tax cut that's now staring you in the face. Republicans all voted against that tax cut. And then they told you to get angry about the stimulus plan. They didn't explain, however, why you were supposed to get angry about getting a tax cut. Why would you be? Wouldn't it make more sense to get angry at the people who voted against that Obama tax cut?

But taxes aren't the really important thing here. The really important thing starts with the next point.

7. Notice that the amount of your pay withheld to pay for your health insurance is more than it was last year.

8. Notice that the amount of your pay withheld to pay for your health insurance is a lot more than it was last year.

I won't ask you to dig up old paychecks from 2008 and 2007, but this has been going on for a long time. Every year, the amount of your paycheck withheld to pay for your health insurance goes up. A lot.

9. Notice the one figure there on your two pay stubs that hasn't changed: Your wage. The raise you didn't get this year went to pay for that big increase in the cost of your health insurance.

10. Here's where I need you to start doing a better job of putting two and two together. If you didn't get a raise last year because the cost of your health insurance went up by a lot, and the cost of your health insurance is going to go up by a lot again this year, what do you think that means for any chance you might have of getting a raise this year?

11. Did you figure it out? That's right. The increasing cost of health insurance means you won't get a raise this year. Or next year. Or the year after that. The increasing cost of health insurance means you will never get a raise again.

That's what I meant when I said you really should be angry. That's what I meant when I said you're getting screwed.

OK, we're almost done. Just a few more points, I promise.

12. The only hope you have of ever seeing another pay raise is if Congress passes health care reform. Without health care reform, the increasing cost of your health insurance will swallow this year's raise. And next year's raise. And pretty soon it won't stop with just your raise. Without health care reform, the increasing cost of your health insurance will start making your pay go down.

13. I wish I could tell you that this was just a worst-case scenario, that this was only something that might, maybe happen, but that wouldn't be true. Without health care reform, this is what will happen. We know this because this is what is happening now. It has been happening for the past 10 years. In 2008, employers spent on average 25 percent more per employee than they did in 2001, but wages on average did not increase during those years. The price of milk went up. The price of gas went up. But wages did not. All of the money that would have gone to higher wages went to pay the higher and higher and higher cost of health insurance. And unless Congress passes health care reform, that will not change.

Well, it will change in the sense that it will keep getting worse, but it won't get better. Unless the problem gets fixed, the problem won't be fixed. That's kind of what "problem" and "fixed" mean.

14. Sadly for any chance you have of ever seeing a raise again, it looks like Congress may not pass health care reform. It looks like they won't do that because they're scared of angry voters who are demanding that they oppose health care reform, angry voters who demand that Congress not do anything that would keep the cost of health insurance from going up and up and up. Angry voters like you.

15. Do you see the point here? You are angrily, loudly demanding that Congress make sure that you never, ever get another pay raise as long as you live. Because of you and because of your angry demands, you and your family and your kids are going to have to get by with less this year than last year. And next year you're going to have to get by with even less. And if you keep angrily demanding that no one must ever fix this problem, then you're going to have to figure out how to get by on less and less every year for the rest of your life.

16. So please, for your own sake, for your family's sake and the sake of your children, stop. Stop demanding that problems not get fixed. Stop demanding that you keep getting screwed. Stay angry -- you should be angry -- but start directing that anger toward the system that's screwing you over and taking money out of your pocket. Start directing that anger toward fixing problems instead of toward making sure they never get fixed. Instead of demanding that Congress oppose health care reform so that you never, ever, get another pay raise, start demanding that they pass health care reform, as soon as possible. Because until they do, you're just going to keep on getting screwed.

And it's going to be that much worse knowing that you brought this on yourself -- that you demanded it.

Thanks for your time.

P.S. -- I didn't mention this because I'm trying here to be as patient with you as I can, but you might also want to keep in mind that in addition to screwing over yourself and screwing over your family and screwing over your own children by demanding that Congress oppose health care reform so that you will never, ever see another pay raise, by doing that you're also demanding that I never, ever see another pay raise, which means that you're also screwing over me, and my family, and my children. Not to mention the millions of poor and uninsured and uninsureable people I didn't even mention above because they don't seem to matter at all to you. And for that, let me just say the only appropriate thing that can be said to someone so determined to do direct, tangible harm to the welfare of my family: Fuck you, you fucking moron."

7 comments:

Devil's Advocate said...

Eh... the dissenters of health care reform aren't pissed off about the reform part. Anybody who disagrees with healthcare reform (and is sane) doesn't actually think that nothing should be done. The problem is the way that this bill proposes to go about it is sort of fundamentally ungrounded. When has government-run anything ever fixed anything at all? This is the gist of dissenter's beliefs. The sane ones, mind.

Clayton said...

I thought that the government run army kicked some ass in WW1 and WW2. I thought that social security did a pretty good job with poverty amongst the elderly. Medicare and Medicaid aren't things we should lose. Highways? Trains? Not perfect, but better than the private sector is giving us. As for government run health care, I guess I'd say that the government run health care (which we weren't even being offered by the Dems) works pretty good. For evidence, see other countries that have it. People like me may well have fantastically good medical insurance, but I'm lucky, I don't think I'd be worse off under the government plan, but most people I know would be better off with some government plan.

But, there's lots we probably agree on (including bracketing the attitudes of the tea partiers who aren't the sane ones).

Devil's Advocate said...

I would say that government-run army is a bad example to use, and ultimately accept it anyway, but that could go on all day. My only point is that the argument in that little excerpt is sort of beating a long dead dead thing. It is no longer about reform or not reform and hasn't been for quite some time.

A mixed economy is sort of a silly thing and unfortunately there is no rule book for such a thing. It was kind of thrown together by a bunch of people who didn't know what they were doing, but really didn't like the king. Theoretically, yes, the government should run healthcare because, by definition, it is a market failure. Capitalism has tried and it's not working out. However, as hinted, folks could argue all day about how the government-run things you listed are sub par. You have to admit (if we're talking about capitalism) that most markets are just better left to the public. That's the whole reason America tries to be capitalistic.

I think the worry is that yeah, it sounds great on paper: everyone gets health care. Eventually, though, it has the great potential to turn into a monster, turn us around, and start fucking us in the ass (as so many things do). Americans are afraid of socialistic things. You can point to examples of gov't healthcare in other countries, but that's just apples to oranges. In the end, there are other ways to fix the problem that are more consistent with American ideals.

P.S. My private army would stomp the gov't's army any day.

Josh said...

It's hard to decipher what you mean about the government's army kicking ass. Does it kick ass in the sense that we can port that kind of ass-kicking (blowing things up) into the American economy? I submit that, no, it probably does not. Social security is breaking, even if not broken, and Medicare and Medicaid "work" insofar as it overpays for the healthcare of a small portion of society. Government run healthcare is difficult to gauge in a country like ours. We are not yet post-industrial like modern Europe, and we simply face health issues they don't. And for the record, the private sector was never given the opportunity to create highways before there was actually the need for them. Trains, on the other hand, did perfectly well without govt. intervention for a long time.

I'm not a tea-bagger, and I find the whole nationalistic displays a little depressing, but I think it's nuts to suggest that there is more than a surface similarity between the tea-baggers and historical libertarians.

Clayton said...

I'm not in to sincere nationalist displays myself.

As for social security breaking, if it breaks, it still did significant good for many people. I'd hate to think what the alternatives would have been if we didn't have social security, medicare, or medicaid. As for government run healthcare, that's not the only thing the tea baggers oppose and I think most options on the table that they did oppose are better than the status quo. Since they seem to want to maintain the status quo or move towards less government intervention, sorry, I'm against 'em. I'm thrilled that they're backing Palin.

Clayton said...

I'm not in to sincere nationalist displays myself.

As for social security breaking, if it breaks, it still did significant good for many people. I'd hate to think what the alternatives would have been if we didn't have social security, medicare, or medicaid. As for government run healthcare, that's not the only thing the tea baggers oppose and I think most options on the table that they did oppose are better than the status quo. Since they seem to want to maintain the status quo or move towards less government intervention, sorry, I'm against 'em. I'm thrilled that they're backing Palin.

Josh said...

Healthcare is kinda difficult. If we think it's best that everyone has some kind of insurance, then Obama has floated some good ideas past. One thing that he has messed up, I think, is the yearly penalty. It's just too low, and it would still be cheaper for someone like myself--young, healthy, pretty poor--to just pay the fine. I don't like some of the other rules such as the cap on premium increase. If they don't strictly enforce the "everyone must have insurance" rule, then there could be big trouble for insurance companies if they can't use pre-existing conditions as some kind of starting point in coverage price. I guess we'll see.