Thursday, August 19, 2010

Oh, CNN

From CNN's story on Laura Schlessinger:
Before she uttered the N-word, before the controversies over homosexuality and religion and morality, Laura Schlessinger was considered a breath of fresh air.

Wasn't she considered a "breath of fresh air" by the very same people who shared her backwards views about homosexuality and religions and morality? I spent a horrible summer working in a chemistry lab washing test tubes and watching centrifuges while forced to listen to her show five days a week. Every bit of it was horrible. Good riddance to bad rubbish.

Can't resist posting this gem, Palin's twit from yesterday:
Dr.Laura:don't retreat...reload! (Steps aside bc her 1st Amend.rights ceased 2exist thx 2activists trying 2silence"isn't American,not fair")

4 comments:

The Modern Philosopher said...

Hello,
Your blog is very interesting and makes a lot of us re-evaluate our opinions of common topics. I was wondering if you would like to visit my blog (even though it is just starting out) at http://thevaluesofliving.blogspot.com/ and see what input you can give.

Thank you,

L. Locke

Anonymous said...

I hope someone explains to Laura Schlessinger the difference between appropriated and derogatory uses of the N-word. A good place to start researching linguistic appropriation would be Robin Brontesma's "A Queer Revolution: Reconceptualizing the Debate Over Linguistic Reclamation."

Anonymous said...

I hope someone explains to Laura Schlessinger's critics the difference between use and mention.

Anonymous said...

Anon (12:43),

Does the fact that Schlessinger mentioned the n-word rather than used it make her argument any less stupid?

She said, "Black guys use it all the time. Turn on HBO, listen to a black comic, and all you hear is nigger, nigger, nigger. If anybody without enough melanin says it, it’s a horrible thing, but if black people say it, it’s affectionate. It’s very confusing."

Schlessinger's confusion could be cleared up with a simple explanation of the difference between appropriated uses, which are common among African American comics, from derogatory uses.